Placemaking – both a process and a philosophy for regional towns

Placemaking is a multi-faceted approach to the planning, design and management of public spaces.

Placemaking uses a towns existing and build assets to make public spaces that people want to connect with and use.

What are the challenges for Regional Towns placemaking?

How are you transforming public spaces?  Whether your project is a regional town renewal or small town heritage refurbishment what principles of placemaking were taken into consideration. As placemaking is a multi-faceted approach it involves a whole range of professionals and stakeholders from a range of disciplines. Whether the organisation is a private or public sector organisation these projects could involve   architects, planners, designers, landscapers, sport and recreation consultants, community enagement, engineers, consultancies, service organisations and academic or research institutions interested in placemaking. You may be creating plazas, parks, streets, riverfronts, waterfronts that you aim to attract people because they are fun and interesting.

We are interested in hearing how you transforming public spaces in regional and rural areas a the Australian Regional Development Conference.

Regional Development Australia: The Conference will feature discussions a stream on planning and building. It will be held in Albury NSW on the 15 – 16 October 2014 with a focus on the broad issues of economic, planning, environment and community development.

Call for papers – rural and regional placemaking: would you like to speak at this conference?

Authors or organisations interested in submitting a paper or presenting a workshop are invited to submit an abstract of no more than 300 words outlining the aims, contents and conclusions of their paper or presentation; or about their intended role in a workshop.

Australian Regional Development Conference

RDA Conference15-16 October 2014, The Commercial Club Albury Secretariat: (T) 61 7 5502 2068 (F) 07 5527 3298 Email: secretariat@regionaldevelopment.org.au URL: www.regionaldevelopment.org.au

 

Rural healthcare: have your say

Rural doctor training scheme in crisis, Grattan Institute paper reveals. The $13 million a year Medical Rural Bonded Scholarship Scheme should be phased out, a government review of health workforce programs says.

A medical scheme that was meant to boost the rural workforce has delivered just one new doctor to the bush after nine years. And doctors receiving a $16,000 taxpayer funded medical school scholarships under another rural workforce scheme are opting to work overseas to avoid their bush practice obligation.

Students who get the scholarship are meant to work for up to six years in a rural or remote area when they graduate. There are over 1200 participants in the scheme but to date fewer than 50 recipients have commenced their return of service period.

Read More News Limited Sunday September 29, 2013

The areas with the lowest GPS per head of population

  • Kimberley-Pilbara (WA)
  • Bentley-Armadale (WA)
  • Northern Territory
  • Central and NW Qld
  • Goldfields-Midwest (WA)
  • Australian Capital Territory
  • Perth North Metro
  • New England (NSW)
  • Southern NSW
  • South West WA

The  Grattan Institute has compared GP rates across Australia and found parts of Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide and South East Queensland boast more than 100 doctors per 100,000 people, while some regions had less than 80.

Read more: SMH

Do you have an interest in rural healthcare and what to share your thoughts on what should be happening with other rural and regional leaders?

The Grattan Institute solutions for the rural GP shortage include creating physician assistants and increasing the responsibilities of pharmist for treatment. Also what is happening with rural medical training supervision and new regional university medical programs. Why is rural Australia not an attractive option for young doctors? We’d like to know what you are thinking…

Regional Development Australia: The Conference will feature discussions on Regional, Rural and Remote Health and Social Development. It will be held in Albury NSW on the 15 – 16 October 2014.

Rural Healthcare

Rural Healthcare

Call for papers – do you want to speak at a conference on rural healthcare?

Authors or organisations interested in submitting a paper or presenting a workshop are invited to submit an abstract of no more than 300 words outlining the aims, contents and conclusions of their paper or presentation; or about their intended role in a workshop.

Australian Regional Development Conference

RDA Conference15-16 October 2014, The Commercial Club Albury Secretariat: (T) 61 7 5502 2068 (F) 07 5527 3298 Email: secretariat@regionaldevelopment.org.au URL: www.regionaldevelopment.org.au

Peri-Urban: rural towns and planning strategy

Rural towns next in the sights of planning strategy   Care needs to be taken when looking to peri-urban areas for sustaining growth.

Rural towns. Towns like Ballan, Broadford, Kilmore and Wonthaggi have been targeted in the new metro plan for accelerated growth.

Communities in Melbourne’s peri-urban area have awoken to find that the state government sees them as part of the answer to accommodating the city’s burgeoning population.

Peri-urban areas are that conflicting mix of agriculture, forests, quaint rural towns, low-density sprawl and, recently, bushfire-prone areas, fanning out for about 100 kilometres from Melbourne. They are already facing issues such as biosecurity, loss of agricultural land and tourism proposals.

Towns like Ballan, Broadford, Kilmore and Wonthaggi have been targeted in the new metro plan for accelerated growth. It has led to substantial new residential development. However, it’s nothing like the increase in the numbers of new residents in the Melbourne growth corridors. But times are changing.

Listing towns for consideration for accelerated development and designating regional cities such as Ballarat, Bendigo and Geelong to accommodate more growth is now firmly on the agenda. This is a far better approach than the predecessor Melbourne 2030, which raised expectations with vague references to the role of regional cities and their transport corridors.

Local councils will be concerned at their and the state government’s capacity to keep up with the demands for new facilities and services in the peri-urban. Communities will be looking for local jobs to accompany the growth.

Melbourne relies on its peri-urban area for much of its fresh food.

The peri-urban areas also play critical roles for water supply. And of course these areas have proven to be some of the most vulnerable in terms of bushfires. There will be many questioning development in these places if there is a prospect of greater loss of life from wildfire.

The peri-urban has been largely overshadowed by the growth of metropolitan areas for years. But it appears its time has come. Its future, and that of the next generation of residents, is in the balance.

Trevor Budge

Trevor Budge AO

Trevor Budge AM

Trevor Budge is an associate professor and heads the community planning and development program at La Trobe’s Bendigo campus. He is a former president of the Victorian division of the Planning Institute of Australia.

 

 

Read more: The Age, October 11, 2013, Trevor Budge

Trevor Budge will be a keynote speaker at the Regional Development  Conference. It will be held in Albury NSW on the 15 – 16 October 2014 with a focus on the broad issues of economic, planning, environment and community development.

Call for papers

Authors or organisations interested in submitting a paper or presenting a workshop are invited to submit an abstract of no more than 300 words outlining the aims, contents and conclusions of their paper or presentation; or about their intended role in a workshop.

Australian Regional Development Conference

RDA Conference15-16 October 2014, The Commercial Club Albury
Secretariat (T) 61 7 5502 2068 (F) 07 5527 3298
Email: secretariat@regionaldevelopment.org.au URL: www.regionaldevelopment.org.au

Victoria’s regional employment strongest in Australia

Victoria’s regional employment strongest in Australia  Thursday, 19 September 2013 Employment in regional Victoria continued to grow over the three months to August, according to Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) figures.

Victoria’s regional employment

Treasurer Michael O’Brien said.  “Regional Victoria’s unemployment rate of 5.4 per cent over the three months to August 2013 is the lowest of all the states,” Mr O’Brien said.  “Today’s figures compare favourably to the Australian regional average of 6 per cent and are significantly stronger than the rate of 6.3 per cent when Labor left office in November 2010.”

“Victoria is the only state where regional jobs increased, and we have the lowest regional unemployment rate in the nation,” Mr O’Brien said.

In the three months to August 2013, employment in regional Victoria increased by 9,600 persons (1.3 per cent) compared to the three months to May 2013.

“These 9,600 new jobs in regional Victoria have been supported by the Victorian Coalition Government’s economic strategy of building for growth, careful management of the state’s finances and record infrastructure investment.

“There are now 38,000 more people employed in regional Victoria than when Labor left office,” Mr O’Brien said.

Over the year, the increase in employment was largely driven by the Central Highlands-Wimmera region and the Goulburn-Ovens-Murray region.

Regional Victoria's strong employment

Regional Victoria’s strong employment

“The Coalition Government’s economic strategy is to build for growth and create jobs,” Mr O’Brien said.  “We are continuing to deliver infrastructure in our regional cities and towns through the $1 billion Regional Growth Fund.

“The former Labor Government left a regional unemployment rate of 6.3 per cent. While the Coalition Government is encouraging new jobs, Labor is opposing job-creating projects such as the East West Link,” Mr O’Brien said.

Read More

Regional Development Australia: The Conference will feature discussions on Regional Employment and job creation. It will be held in Albury NSW on the 15 – 16 October 2014 with a focus on the broad issues of economic, planning, environment and community development.

The Regional Development Australia: Innovation Awards are being held in conjunction to the conference with an aim to recognise and showcase individuals and organisations in four categories: economic development, planning and building, environment and resilience and community development.

Call for papers – do you want to speak on regional employment?

Authors or organisations interested in submitting a paper or presenting a workshop are invited to submit an abstract of no more than 300 words outlining the aims, contents and conclusions of their paper or presentation; or about their intended role in a workshop.

All proposals will be reviewed by the Conference Program Committee. Presentations will be selected to provide a program that offers a comprehensive and diverse treatment of issues related to the conference theme.

Australian Regional Development Conference

RDA Conference15-16 October 2014, The Commercial Club Albury Secretariat: (T) 61 7 5502 2068 (F) 07 5527 3298 Email: secretariat@regionaldevelopment.org.au URL: www.regionaldevelopment.org.au

 

Rural Poverty in Australia is worse in remote regions

 

Rural poverty in Australia is worse in remote regions, a report from National Rural Health Alliance and the Australian Council of Social Service found those living in the most remote locations were the worst off.

The report, A Snapshot of Poverty in Rural and Regional Australia, revealed that people living outside major cities had lower levels of education, higher unemployment, poorer physical and mental health and less access to medical care.

Nearly one in three people live outside our major cities – in rural, regional and remote areas across Australia

Allowing for the costs of housing, poverty is slightly worse in rural, regional and remote areas (13.1 per cent ‘outside capital cities’) than in capital cities (12.6 per cent). When housing costs (which are higher in capital cities) are not taken into account, that divide becomes starker.

Poverty in rural and regional Australia has a particular set of characteristics, including:  generally lower incomes of those living in these regions; reduced access to services such as health, education and transport; declining employment opportunities; and  distance and isolation.

The report is available on the National Rural Health Alliance  website

Regional Development Australia: The Conference will feature discussions on Regional Health and Social Development. It will be held in Albury NSW on the 15 – 16 October 2014.

Call for papers

Authors or organisations interested in submitting a paper or presenting a workshop are invited to submit an abstract of no more than 300 words outlining the aims, contents and conclusions of their paper or presentation; or about their intended role in a workshop.

All proposals will be reviewed by the Conference Program Committee. Presentations will be selected to provide a program that offers a comprehensive and diverse treatment of issues related to the conference theme.

Australian Regional Development Conference

RDA Conference15-16 October 2014, The Commercial Club Albury Secretariat: (T) 61 7 5502 2068 (F) 07 5527 3298 Email: secretariat@regionaldevelopment.org.au URL: www.regionaldevelopment.org.au