Building resilient regional communities

What makes a resilient community?  Rural and Regional communities are incorporating resilience concepts into their management and planning.

Building resilient communities has become the new catch cry – resilient communities depend on infrastructure and services such as adequate roads, telephone, health services and transport. They also need enthusiastic and motivated people, community organisations that work well, a long term ‘vision’ for the community and a strong focus on practical action to achieve the vision.

Research has suggested that communities that are successful in supporting healthy, sustainable community and economic development pay attention to seven types of capital: natural, cultural, human, social, political, financial and built. (Building stronger local communities, Queensland Government)

The Community and Regional Resilience Institute (CARRI) is focused on enhancing the resilience of communities.

Their definition of “Resilience is an inherent and dynamic attribute of the community. This means that it exists throughout the life of the community. Potentially it can either be determined absolutely, or at least changes in a community’s resilience can be detected.

Adaptability is at the core of this attribute. Adaptation can occur either in response to or in anticipation of a crisis.

Any adaptation must improve the community, i.e., must result in a positive outcome (positive trajectory) for the community relative to its state after experiencing adversity. This can best be detected by considering the level of functionality of the community after a crisis.

Resilience should be defined in a manner that enables useful predictions to be made about a community’s ability to recover from adversity. This will enable communities to assess their resilience and take action to improve it if necessary.”

Based on this, CARRI has developed the following definition for its use:

“Community resilience is the capability to anticipate risk, limit impact, and bounce back rapidly through survival, adaptability, evolution, and growth in the face of turbulent change.”

Connecting  Science, Planning, Policy and People in resilience thinking, strategic planning, adaptive governance and management. (read more about CARRI)

ResilienceAustraliaResilience Australia is a special interest group formed by members of the The Association for Sustainability in Business, an incorporated non-government, not-for-profit organisation. Resilience Australia supports The Australian Regional Development conference, it aims to facilitate building stronger communities through innovation and collaboration.

 Regional Development Australia: The Conference will be held in Albury NSW on the 15 – 16 October 2014 with a focus on the broad issues of economic, planning, environment and community development.

The Regional Development Australia: Innovation Awards are being held in conjunction to the conference with an aim to recognise and showcase individuals and organisations in four categories: economic development, planning and building, environment and resilience and community development.

Call for papers – If you are interested in speaking on building resilient regional, rural and local communities we’d like to hear your story.

Authors or organisations interested in submitting a paper or presenting a workshop are invited to submit an abstract of no more than 300 words outlining the aims, contents and conclusions of their paper or presentation; or about their intended role in a workshop.

Australian Regional Development Conference

RDA Conference15-16 October 2014, The Commercial Club Albury Secretariat: (T) 61 7 5502 2068 (F) 07 5527 3298 Email: secretariat@regionaldevelopment.org.au URL: www.regionaldevelopment.org.au

 

 

 

Regional Innovation: Did you know?

Australia’s inventions include: the black box flight recorder; the bionic ear; high speed WiFi; the Gardasil cervical cancer vaccine; the flu treatment drug Relenza; the pacemaker; the plastic disposable syringe: the dual-flush toilet; anti-counterfeiting technology for banknotes; and spray-on skin for burns victims (Read More about innovation)

The Australian Regional Development Conference will showcase Regional Innovation. It will be held in Albury NSW on the 15 – 16 October 2014 with a focus on the broad issues of economic, planning, environment and community development.

A keynote speaker at the conference will be Professor Y. Jay Guo who is the Research Director, Smart and Secure Infrastructure, Digital Productivity and Services National. Prof. Yingjie Jay Guo is an internationally recognised R&D leader with proven track record, a well established scientist with over 250 publications and expertise in antennas and wireless communications systems, and an innovator with strong industrial impact. He is the recipient of Australia Government Engineering Innovation Award (2012), Australia Engineering Excellence Award (2007) and CSIRO Chairman’s Medal (2007 & 2012).

The Regional Development Australia: Innovation Awards are being held in conjunction to the conference with an aim to recognise and showcase individuals and organisations in four categories: economic development, planning and building, environment and resilience and community development.

Call for papers – would you like to speak about innovation for Regional Australia?

Authors or organisations interested in submitting a paper or presenting a workshop are invited to submit an abstract of no more than 300 words outlining the aims, contents and conclusions of their paper or presentation; or about their intended role in a workshop.

Australian Regional Development Conference

RDA Conference15-16 October 2014, The Commercial Club Albury Secretariat: (T) 61 7 5502 2068 (F) 07 5527 3298 Email: secretariat@regionaldevelopment.org.au URL: www.regionaldevelopment.org.au

 

Community Engagement in Regional Communities

Community engagement can be difficult. Whether it is  information sharing, consultation or active participation in the decision making processes. Whether it is formal or informal community enagement. The aim is to improve the quality of decisions and for communities to understand the processes. For regional communities the geographic spread is a compounding factor in making community engagement difficult.

An understanding of community engagement principles and practices are essential for planning, approving or implementing community engagement activities or programs. Online tools and social media can help facilitate the community enagement process.

Community Engagement

Community Engagement

The Queensland government’s “Get involved community capacity building toolkit” was developed by the Queensland Department of Communities in response to conversations with people in rural and regional communities through the Blueprint for the Bush. It also has links with the Strengthening NGOs project, particularly the Community Door website — a ‘one-stop shop’ for information, tools and resources to support community-based organisations in Queensland.

What are the unique issues for community engagement in regional Australia?  

community engagement

Community Engagement with regional communities will be discussed at an Australian Regional Development Conference. We would like to hear from a wide range of organisations including local, state and federal government representatives, regional bodies, private organisations, NGOs and other organisations across Australia on best practice in community engagement and consultations.

Australian Regional Development Conference will be held in Albury NSW on the 15 – 16 October 2014. The conference will focus on the broad issues of economic, planning, environment and community development.

Call for papers – Community Engagement

Authors or organisations interested in submitting a paper or presenting a workshop are invited to submit an abstract of no more than 300 words outlining the aims, contents and conclusions of their paper or presentation; or about their intended role in a workshop.

Australian Regional Development Conference

RDA Conference15-16 October 2014, The Commercial Club Albury Secretariat: (T) 61 7 5502 2068 (F) 07 5527 3298 Email: secretariat@regionaldevelopment.org.au URL: www.regionaldevelopment.org.au

 

Community Economic Development: small town revitalisation

Community Economic Development in rural Australia is vital for revitalising small towns. What are the key factors in revitalising rural and small town communities?

Community Engagement
Community Engagement

 

 

The following  “ingredients” have been identified by the Centre for Small Town Development :

 

  • Passionate local people
  • Positive Community Mind-Set
  • A “Can Do” self-reliant spirit
  • A shared community vision of the future
  • A willingness to seek smarter ways, experiment, make changes
  • Opportunity and obsession
  • Recognition of healthy and sustainable community behaviours
  • Local leadership or champions
  • A focus on youth development
  • Promotion of women in leadership roles.
  • Evidence of community pride and confidence
  • Recognition of the importance of local business
  • A practical development agenda
  • A local based focus and structure
  • A clear and unique marketable identity
  • Forging of partnerships with neighbouring communities
  • Local education opportunities
  • Presence of a positive local newspaper
  • A local government council that provides
  • Leadership and vision, and is a “facilitator” rather than “regulator”

The Australian Regional Development Conference theme is “Where to from here?” and will cover the broad areas of regional development: economic; planning; environment and community.

This year’s conference will focus around the following themes: Natural Resource Management; Planning and Building; Social and Recreation; Economic Development; Community Development; Employment; Education and Training; Policy; Infrastructure; Digital and IT and Open Category.

Challenges in revitalising rural and regional communities will be addressed at this conference.

Call for papers – would you like to speak on rural and regional revitalisations and community economic development?

Authors or organisations interested in submitting a paper or presenting a workshop are invited to submit an abstract of no more than 300 words outlining the aims, contents and conclusions of their paper or presentation; or about their intended role in a workshop.

Australian Regional Development Conference

RDA Conference15-16 October 2014, The Commercial Club Albury Secretariat: (T) 61 7 5502 2068 (F) 07 5527 3298 Email: secretariat@regionaldevelopment.org.au URL: www.regionaldevelopment.org.au

 

 

Mining towns: what happens after the boom

What happens to towns and communities when mines close down. Australia has lots of old abandoned “ghost towns” that were once thriving mining towns.  

The decline of mining towns has been addressed in a paper ” The shrinking mining city: urban dynamics and contested territory. ” Martinez-Fernandez C, Wu CT, Schatz LK, Taira N, Vargas-Hernández JG. Source University of Western Sydney, Australia.

gwalia-gold-mining-ghost-town-western-australiaShrinking mining towns once prosperous settlements servicing a mining site or a system of mining sites are characterized by long-term population and/or economic decline.

This dependence on one main industry produces a parallel development in the fluctuations of both workforce and population. Thus, the strategies of the main company in these towns can, to a great extent, determine future developments and have a great impact on urban management plans.

Climate conditions, knowledge, education and health services, as well as transportation links, are important factors that have impacted on lifestyles in mining cities, but it is the parallel development with the private sector operators (often a single corporation) that constitutes the distinctive feature of these cities and that ultimately defines their shrinkage. Read More

Mining towns after the boom, the impact on planning and social infrastructure  – please tell us your story.

Call for papers – there will be sustainability and planning streams at the conference, would you like to speak?

Authors or organisations interested in submitting a paper or presenting a workshop are invited to submit an abstract of no more than 300 words outlining the aims, contents and conclusions of their paper or presentation; or about their intended role in a workshop.

Australian Regional Development Conference

RDA Conference15-16 October 2014, The Commercial Club Albury Secretariat: (T) 61 7 5502 2068 (F) 07 5527 3298 Email: secretariat@regionaldevelopment.org.au URL: www.regionaldevelopment.org.au