Regional Philanthropy: Partnerships On the Rise

There’s been an increase in regional philanthropy. Philanthropic organisations are partnering with rural and regional communities to build local infrastructure and social capital, according to the Foundation for Rural and Regional Renewal (FRRR).

FRRR’s CEO Alexandra Gartmann said the organisation had recently helped to facilitate a number of new partnerships.

Place-based approaches to community development are becoming increasingly prevalent. For example, the NSW Government has recently invested in a program that FRRR will run together with Philanthropy Australia to direct funds to the Hunter and Mid North Coast of NSW,” Gartmann said.

“We have also helped to facilitate programs like the Pratt Foundation / Visy Employees partnership with Tumut and the Vincent Fairfax Family Foundation’s support for the Lachlan region in NSW.

Regional Philanthropy

“These are all examples of philanthropy helping to strengthen rural and regional communities.”

Tammy Bugg, Executive Officer of Western Plains Regional Development Inc., the host organisation of the Lachlan Region Community Grants Program which was established with the support of VFFF said many small community organisations struggled to maintain local infrastructure and to invest in new equipment and new technologies.

“We are very fortunate to have support from VFFF to invest in worthwhile organisations and activities that continue to develop our communities,” Bugg said.

“For the philanthropic organisations, the attraction of place-based programs is the ability to invest in local communities and their capacity, to bring about sustained social outcomes.”

Jenny Wheatley, CEO of Vincent Fairfax Family Foundation, said for them, it was about assisting the community meet its goals and addressed the issues it saw as important.

“This takes time and involves more than giving money; it’s a relationship and that involves listening, shared interests and respect. We work with the team executing the program in Condobolin in the hope that our combined forces will create the outcomes the community wants to see, in a sustainable way, enabling something beyond money for a grants program,” Wheatley said.

The Lachlan Region Grants program is structured as a challenge grant program – another trend that is becoming increasingly prevalent, according to FRRR’s CEO Alexandra Gartmann.

“Philanthropic organisations are often a catalytic investment in a community. But we’ve found that those funds have even more impact if local communities can also contribute. It builds ownership of the program if people locally are asked to contribute,” Gartmann said.

“They then not only want to apply for the funds, but they also feel like they have been part of bringing the projects and the program as a whole to fruition.”

According to Gartmann, the catalytic impact of these grants should not be underestimated.

“It varies from program to program, but on average, for every dollar we invest in a grant program, a further three dollars are contributed by others – either in kind or in cash. Every dollar has an impact and every grant we make enables another community to achieve a locally-developed solution to a pressing issue in their community,” she said.

The Foundation for Rural and Regional Renewal (FRRR) was established in 2000 to support the renewal of rural and regional communities in Australia through partnerships with the private sector, philanthropy and governments.

It said its mission was to champion the economic and social strength of Australia’s regional, rural and remote communities through partnerships with the private sectors, philanthropy and governments.

In its first 10 years, FRRR managed the distribution of more than $35 million in grants and provided substantial capacity building support to community organisations across the nation. –

Read More Read: September 19, 2013, Pro Bono

Australian Regional Development Conference will feature discussions on economic and community development. It will be held in Albury NSW on the 15 – 16 October 2014 with a focus on the broad issues of economic, planning, environment and community development.

Call for papers – would you like to speak on regional and rural philanthropy?

Authors or organisations interested in submitting a paper or presenting a workshop are invited to submit an abstract of no more than 300 words outlining the aims, contents and conclusions of their paper or presentation; or about their intended role in a workshop.

Australian Regional Development Conference
15-16 October 2014, The Commercial Club Albury Secretariat: (T) 61 7 5502 2068 (F) 07 5527 3298 Email: secretariat@regionaldevelopment.org.au URL: www.regionaldevelopment.org.au
 
 
 
Resilience Australia

Resilience Australia

Australian Regional Development Conference is an initiative of Resilience Australia

 

Rural Health Care and regional development are mutually supportive

Rural Health Care in Australia is part of a rural urban divide discussion. People living in rural areas tend to have shorter lives and higher levels of illness and disease risk factors than those in major cities.

It is also true that, on average, people living in rural Australia do not always have the same opportunities for good health as those living in major cities.For example, residents of more inaccessible areas of Australia are generally disadvantaged in their access to good and services, educational and employment opportunities and income.

In contrast, rural Australians generally have higher levels of social cohesiveness, for example, higher rates of participation in volunteer work and feelings of safety in their community. (Australian Institute of Health Welfare)

Rural Health Care

Impact of rurality on health status – Health outcomes, as exemplified by higher rates of death, tend to be poorer outside major cities. The main contributors to higher death rates in regional and remote areas are coronary heart disease, other circulatory diseases, motor vehicle accidents and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (e.g. emphysema). These higher death rates may relate to differences in access to services, risk factors and the regional/remote environment. (Australian Institute of Health Welfare)

Data quality issues, the limited nature of available data-sets, poor identification of Indigenous people in data collections and differences between the operation of health systems in major cities and regional and remote areas, can often make comparison difficult.

Australian Regional Development Conference will feature discussions on Rural, Remote and Regional health care. It will be held in Albury NSW on the 15 – 16 October 2014. The conference with a focus on the broad issues of economic, planning, environment and community development. The conference will focus on the improvement of economic and social outcomes for regional Australia.

“Regional development and good health are mutually supportive. By providing jobs, services and infrastructure, regional development contributes to the social determinants of good health. In return, a healthy community provides one of the bases for successful local businesses.” National Rural Health Alliance

rural urban divide for healthcare
rural urban divide for healthcare

Call for papers – rural, remote and regional health care, would you like to speak at this conference

Authors or organisations interested in submitting a paper or presenting a workshop are invited to submit an abstract of no more than 300 words outlining the aims, contents and conclusions of their paper or presentation; or about their intended role in a workshop.

 

RDA ConferenceAustralian Regional Development Conference

15-16 October 2014, The Commercial Club Albury Secretariat: (T) 61 7 5502 2068 (F) 07 5527 3298 Email: secretariat@regionaldevelopment.org.au URL: www.regionaldevelopment.org.au

 

Sustainable regional development in Australia

“Sustainable development is development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.” Sustainable development Our Common Future, also known as the Brundtland Report.

Sustainable regional development in Australia was an initiative of the previous Australian Government, investing $29.2 million over four years to promote sustainable development in high growth regions across Australia through the Sustainable Regional Development program. (Sustainable Regional Development program is one of the measures under Sustainable Australia – Sustainable Communities: A Population Strategy for Australia)

Why are sustainable regional communities important?

Changes in Australian population and economy need to be factored in when plannning places that people want to live now and in the future.

The key challenge facing many developing regions around the country is the need to respond to population and economic growth, whilst managing impacts to the environment. By addressing environmental, social, and economic factors through long-term strategic planning, these pressures can be addressed in an effective and positive way.

Commonwealth, state and local governments, and the community to coordinate the sharing of information and achieve the objectives of the Sustainable Regional Development program. Find out more

 

Sustainable development
Sustainable development

 Regional Development Australia: The Conference will focvus on sustainable development. It will be held in Albury NSW on the 15 – 16 October 2014 with a focus on the broad issues of economic, planning, environment and community development.

Call for papers – sustainable development: do you want to speak at this conference?

Authors or organisations interested in submitting a paper or presenting a workshop are invited to submit an abstract of no more than 300 words outlining the aims, contents and conclusions of their paper or presentation; or about their intended role in a workshop.

Sustainable towns
Sustainable towns

 

The Australian Regional Development Conference is supported by The Association for Sustainability in Business Inc a non government, not-for-profit organisation. The Association provides a forum for our member communities, to examine and discuss challenges to improving our sustainability and understanding the key factors that determine sustainable outcomes. The Association offers members access to practical solutions and strategies that will assist the development of sustainable practice.

RDA ConferenceAustralian Regional Development Conference
15-16 October 2014, The Commercial Club Albury Secretariat: (T) 61 7 5502 2068
(F) 07 5527 3298 Email: secretariat@regionaldevelopment.org.au URL: www.regionaldevelopment.org.au

 

Tree Change: place-marketing regional Australia

How, if possible, do we re-populate declining rural and regional areas? The book, Rural Revival?: Place Marketing Tree Change and Regional Migration in Australia examines this crucial and complex issue in relation to Australia, and the manner in which a particular organization, Country Week, has emerged and developed as one means of stimulating the repopulation of declining or stagnating areas.

Rural Revival?: Place Marketing Tree Change and Regional Migration in Australia
John Connell, Phil Mcmanus, Ashgate Publishing, Ltd., 28/11/2012
Tree change to regional Australia

Tree change to regional Australia

Local councils, tourist bodies, state government, marketing bodies and regional companies are collaborating to try to attract people to move to inland regional ares.

Make the Tree Change to regional NSW, with a $7000 incentive as an attraction. The marketing communication material appeals to economic, housing, family, lifestyle values and aspirations.

NSW’s Riverina Region (Country Change) promotion includes the Riverina towns of Hillston, Hay, Griffith, Narrandera, Tumbarumba, Holbrook, Leeton, Temora,  Lockhart and Deniliquin

The $7000 NSW Regional Relocation Grant Criteria includes the following:

  • Be buying the Riverina home for yourself, not for anyone else or to put in trust
  • Be an Australian citizen or permanent residentMust enter into a purchase agreement on a Riverina home between 1 July 2011 and 30 June 2015
  • Have owned (mortgaged) and occupied your city residence for at least one year before buying your regional home
  • Be purchasing a home worth less than $600,000
  • Sell your city residence within 12 months of buying your Riverina home
  • Live in your Riverina home for 12 continuous months commencing within 12 months of purchasing it
  • Have not received any other NSW Regional Relocation Grant (Home Buyers Grant) Act 2011

Another example is Evo Cities, in an Australian first, seven of NSW’s leading regional cities have united to form the Evocities campaign and encourage people to live, work and invest in an Evocity. The seven Evocities are Albury, Armidale, Bathurst, Dubbo, Orange, Tamworth and Wagga Wagga. The campaign describes this is as a city change not a tree change.

Each of the seven cities has dedicated resources and funding to the campaign, and has in turn secured Australian Government funding, as well as support from the NSW State Government and corporate sponsors.

The Evocity name was coined because the cities are centres of Energy, Vision and Opportunity Read more

Australian Regional Development Conference , “Where to from here?” will cover the broad areas of regional development; economic, planning, environment and community.

Call for papers – Would you like to speak at a conference on tree-change, sea-change, populations shifts in regional Australia?

Authors or organisations interested in submitting a paper or presenting a workshop are invited to submit an abstract of no more than 300 words outlining the aims, contents and conclusions of their paper or presentation; or about their intended role in a workshop.

All proposals will be reviewed by the Conference Program Committee. Presentations will be selected to provide a program that offers a comprehensive and diverse treatment of issues related to the conference theme.

Australian Regional Development Conference

RDA Conference15-16 October 2014, The Commercial Club Albury Secretariat: (T) 61 7 5502 2068 (F) 07 5527 3298 Email: secretariat@regionaldevelopment.org.au URL: www.regionaldevelopment.org.au