Roads to Recovery – infrastructure investment in Victoria

Roads to Recovery Programme Funding Allocations 2009-2014, the objective of Roads to Recovery is to contribute to the Infrastructure Investment Programme through supporting maintenance of the nation’s local road infrastructure asset, which facilitates greater access for Australians and improved safety, economic and social outcomes.

From 2009-10 to 2013-14 the Government will provide $1.75 billion ($373.5 million in 2013-14) under the Roads to Recovery programme, to be distributed to Australia’s local councils, state and territory Governments responsible for local roads in the

regional roads

regional roads

unincorporated areas (where there are no councils) and the Indian Ocean Territories.

We are interested in hearing from you on what is needed to improve roads in Victoria at the Australian Regional Development Conference will be held on the 15-16 October in Albury 2014. www.regionaldevelopment.org.au

The following table lists the Roads to Recovery funding allocations for Victorian councils.

Victorian Councils Roads to Recovery Life of Program Allocation 2009-10 to 2013-14 Roads to Recovery Allocation for 2013-14
Alpine Shire
2,806,434
561,866
Ararat Rural City Council
5,394,564
1,078,915
Ballarat City Council
4,848,382
969,678
Banyule City Council
2,291,547
476,660
Bass Coast Shire Council
3,412,707
667,625
Baw Baw Shire Council
6,593,082
889,792
Bayside City Council
1,237,359
247,472
Benalla Rural City Council
3,392,658
734,751
City of Boroondara
2,129,377
408,630
Brimbank City Council
3,849,197
769,844
Buloke Shire Council
5,220,320
300,167
Campaspe Shire Council
10,076,750
2,015,350
Cardinia Shire Council
5,952,966
1,275,663
Casey City Council
4,956,675
Central Goldfields Shire Council
2,553,401
647,863
Colac Otway Shire
6,222,210
1,302,826
Corangamite Shire Council
8,121,845
1,624,369
City of Darebin
2,272,507
516,226
East Gippsland Shire Council
11,722,565
2,942,590
Frankston City Council
2,957,152
659,272
Gannawarra Shire Council
4,591,545
663,121
City of Glen Eira
1,439,887
173,456
Glenelg Shire Council
7,980,586
1,619,814
Golden Plains Shire Council
4,944,169
988,836
Greater Bendigo City Council
7,605,505
1,337,264
City of Greater Dandenong
3,256,622
651,325
City of Greater Geelong
7,748,808
1,349,763
Greater Shepparton City Council
7,265,072
1,322,781
Hepburn Shire Council
3,456,838
686,821
Hindmarsh Shire Council
4,006,318
855,430
Hobsons Bay City Council
1,705,075
341,060
Horsham Rural City Council
5,015,989
1,003,196
Hume City Council
4,471,656
1,106,943
Indigo Shire Council
4,123,505
880,550
Kingston City Council
2,849,211
569,843
City of Knox
2,668,841
533,769
Latrobe City Council
5,873,957
1,689,166
Loddon Shire Council
8,114,643
2,182,229
Macedon Ranges Shire Council
5,010,339
1,365,082
Manningham City Council
2,011,155
402,231
Mansfield Shire Council
2,371,535
497,921
City of Maribyrnong
1,161,475
232,295
Maroondah City Council
1,906,422
381,286
Melbourne City Council
 1,737,249
347,399
Shire of Melton
3,009,808
203,925
Mildura Rural City Council
8,847,703
1,865,712
Mitchell Shire Council
4,425,280
1,242,774
Moira Shire Council
8,311,758
1,634,953
Monash City Council
2,766,600
553,320
Moonee Valley City Council
 1,626,450
426,160
Moorabool Shire Council
4,540,216
908,043
Moreland City Council
2,185,740
437,148
Mornington Peninsula Shire Council
5,966,567
1,004,416
Mount Alexander Shire Council
 3,511,607
984,174
Shire of Moyne
9,818,154
1,964,440
Shire of Murrindindi
 4,167,501
716,644
Nillumbik Shire Council
2,918,161
567,160
Northern Grampians Shire Council
6,273,172
1,269,112
City of Port Phillip
983,769
172,601
Pyrenees Shire Council
5,195,293
1,343,014
Borough of Queenscliffe
144,560
46,088
South Gippsland Shire Council
 8,181,531
1,636,307
Southern Grampians Shire Council
7,457,843
1,025,889
Stonnington City Council
 994,547
49,939
Shire of Strathbogie
 4,915,912
974,668
Surf Coast Shire
3,237,509
647,502
Swan Hill Rural City Council
4,821,672
1,178,905
Shire of Towong
 3,592,522
718,506
Wangaratta Rural City Council
5,393,729
1,093,086
Warrnambool City Council
 1,625,861
317,924
Wellington Shire Council
 11,457,191
2,983,359
West Wimmera Shire Council
 5,968,329
1,501,704
Whitehorse City Council
2,095,489
419,097
City of Whittlesea
 3,465,924
824,903
Wodonga City Council
2,137,467
463,328
Wyndham City Council
3,569,294
 527,717
Yarra City Council
 1,017,121
202,121
Shire of Yarra Ranges
 9,230,532
1,846,108
Yarriambiack Shire Council
4,817,088
1,285,407
Vic Total
356,000,000
72,307,294

Building Resilient Regions after a Natural Disaster

Building Resilient Regions after a natural disaster

Assessing policies to build resilient regions that have been affected by large natural disasters requires place-based policy responses, for two main reasons:

• Short-term reconstruction decisions will impact the options available for long-term sustainable development. Reconstruction, hence, must become the occasion to re-think and implement a coherent strategy of economic and social development focused on the economic potential and job creation of the areas hit.

• Implementation of the development strategy needs an effective governance framework and tools to guarantee the coordination among public and private actors and national-local partnership.

OECD policy recommendations for rebuilding after a natural disaster

Discussions between experts from OECD regions hit by natural disasters led to the elaboration of eight policy recommendations for rebuilding after a natural disaster.

  •  Make sure that short-term decisions do not constrain long-term options.
  • Identify the economic base and the social and economic drivers specific to the region to increase its resilience.
  • Develop an integrated strategy to redevelopment after a natural disaster by strengthening the dialogue among stakeholders to raise the profile of needed reforms and quality of decisions.
  • Strategic choices have to be locally led.
  • Use the occasion of a crisis to introduce reforms or standards for the country.
  • Foster public participation to help decision making.
  • Make public deliberation a regular component of the regional development strategy.
  • Build trust, increase accountability of policy-making and improve capacity of

regional fire

 Natural disaster recovery and resilience will be addressed at the Australian Regional Development Conference being held on 15-16 October Albury 2014 www.regionaldevelopment.org.au. The Early Bird ends on 4th September 2014.

 

 

Country Newspapers for local content on Regional Development

Country newspapers have the highest level of local content of any medium – unmatched by radio and television. The high level of penetration to all segments, offers an uncluttered environment and makes them an ideal medium for your advertising campaign. According to the Victorian Country Press Association . Country papers are unique because unlike their metropolitan cousins they engage directly with their local communities making them the focal point when decisions are made. http://www.vcpa.com.au/ 

Country Newspapers

We welcome Country media and Newspapers at the Australian Regional Development Conference. The Conference will focus on the broad issues of economic, planning, environment and community development. The aim of the conference is to advance economic and social outcomes for regional Australia. The conference provides the opportunity to discuss the challenges, opportunities and future of regional Australia

Australian Regional Development Conference will be held in Albury NSW on the 15 – 16 October 2014 at the Commercial Club

media passTo be considered for a complimentary press pass, please send a copy of your credentials to:   Conference Secretariat    Emailsecretariat@regionaldevelopment.org.au Ph: (61 7) 5502 2068

If you like reading about Country Newspapers see the article on Crickey A country practice: how bush newspapers might outsmart metros by Gabrielle Chan

 

Build your brand in regional Australia

Stand out from your competitors, build your brand and reach your target market by partnering with the Association for Sustainability in Business, the host of the Australian Regional Development Conference.

A sponsorship package with Association for Sustainability in Business will give your business a unique opportunity to align your brand with the biggest Regional Development event in Australia and make a greater impact with key decision makers and influential business advisers. Association for Sustainability in Business is positioned as the ‘must attend’ industry event of the year. The quality of visitors and the high attendance levels at the event make sponsoring Association for Sustainability in Business an attractive opportunity.

Other benefits include:

  • can help build brand awareness through pre, during and post conference promotions in a difficult to reach market
  • Help to launch your products and services into the marketplace through a targeted trade marketing campaign consisting of electronic direct marketing campaigns, website promotions, social media including Linkedin, Twitter, Facebook and Blogs
  • Gain access to a diverse range of contacts through the networking events
  • Expose your brand to an regional, rural and remote audience conveniently in one place at one time
  • Alliance with a premier conference helps you increase your credibility in the industry

Build your brand in regional Australia

exhibitorFor more information about sponsorship  go to the website to request a prospectus or contact the Secretariat on please email secretariat@regionaldevelopment.org.au

Australian Regional Development Conference
15-16 October Albury 2014 www.regionaldevelopment.org.au
 

Positive mental health key to tackling rural climate change

By Aysha Fleming, CSIRO

Mental health has been an issue in rural areas for the past few decades. Climate change will only add more stress to the lives of rural people.

While a report by the Climate Institute shows broad scale effects of climate change on mental health are likely in the future, our research is finding that farmers in vulnerable communities are suffering already.

Early findings from our study on key drivers of change in the wine industry found mental health was already affecting farmers’ decision making and capacity to act. We surveyed 50 winegrowers from southern Australia in March and April this year and will follow up with them again during the next three years.

A mental health problem that’s happening now

Grape growers are already experiencing the emotional impacts of climate variability and the perceived risks associated with future climate change.

Some are anxious about the future or about specific weather events (such as drought). Some are depressed about the viability of the industry in the future. Some are confused about the facts of climate science and sceptical that we can make a difference.

In addition, water policy changes, a national oversupply of grapes combined with a global economic down turn and international competition are starting to take their toll on grape growers’ mental resilience.

The stress that many grape growers are under can turn into more serious mental illnesses requiring treatment, or thoughts of suicide, if the problems are not addressed and the situation continues over a long time.

The suicide rate in rural Australia is already alarming, with some reports as high as one suicide per week. Mental health is a complex problem for farmers even without the added factor of climate change. Stress over a long period as a precondition for depression is emerging in the wine industry.

Not just farmers struggle; communities need help too

Farming communities in Australia are renowned for their tough characteristics and their ability to cope with the iconic volatility of Australian weather. Rural communities are also often tight-knit and supportive. They look out for one another.

Sense of community, strong networks and social capital are often high in rural communities. However, a reliance on “being tough” can also mean that rural communities don’t seek help when they need it.

Access to GPs can be difficult in rural areas, so even those who might seek help may not find it. The internet is a major source of information about mental health symptoms and treatment, so lack of access to a computer or high speed internet can also be a barrier.

Communities are dwindling because of downsizing, relocating for work or because young people are leaving. All these can make the general mood of communities less positive.

Taking action helps farmers cope

Some farmers in the grape growing community in Southern Australia are positive about their ability to respond to climate change. Some can even see potential benefits in early action.

These farmers are already starting to act, rather than waiting for winery mandates or government initiatives.

One example is a grower installing a “sun farm” to provide an alternative source of energy and a potential income stream. Other growers are planting Spanish varieties that are more drought and heat tolerant.

These farmers can brand their grapes as “sustainably produced”. That can be very appealing to wineries.

Other farmers are relocating to properties for grape growing in cooler, wetter areas to hedge against warming and drying climate trends.

“Long term planning gives you certainty. Especially when times are tough, you need to set yourself up long term and invest in the future,” one grape grower told us.

Taking action proactively can help to allay mental health issues such as depression and anxiety. Making your own decisions about how to act rather than waiting for someone else to tell you what to do can be very empowering.

Finding the actions where there are ‘win-win’ outcomes also motivates further change as the multiple benefits of action become apparent. Examples like those above work to adapt to climate conditions and add a point of difference that is appealing to markets. In other cases, reducing inputs of chemicals, fertiliser and diesel saves money and also reduces carbon emissions.

Helping farmers find and set up ways to prepare their farms for a changing climate is the best way to create a positive frame of mind. Farmers dealing positively with climate change, will make a difference to our future environment.

Aysha Fleming does not work for, consult to, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and has no relevant affiliations.

The Conversation

This article was originally published at The Conversation.
Read the original article.

Rural Mental Health

Rural health and mental health to be discussed at the Australian Regional Development Conference.

15-16 October 2014, The Commercial Club Albury
Secretariat (T) 61 7 5502 2068 (F) 07 5527 3298
Email: secretariat@regionaldevelopment.org.au URL: www.regionaldevelopment.org.au
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