Kim Hewson, Principal at Economic Transitions will present on the development of strategies for sustainable tourism

Kim Hewson, Principal at Economic Transitions will present on developing strategies for sustainable tourism at the Australian Regional Development Conference being held in Albury on the 26– 27 August 2015.

Kim Hewson

Kim Hewson

Speaker Introduction:  Kim Hewson has over 30 years’ experience in the hospitality and tourism industry, including positions as General Manager of hotels in Perth, Regional Director of Sales and Marketing for an international hotel chain leading their global offices, and director of Australian and New Zealand markets with various hospitality and tourism products.  With experience in a number of regional and international locations, Kim has a solid understanding of the global environment and the diversified requirements of tourists.

Kim graduated from the University of Western Australia with an Executive Master of Business Administration (EMBA). With an interest in sustainable tourism, Kim completed her thesis on, ‘A Strategic Analysis of the Key Success Factors of Developing a Sustainable Tourism Resort in a Remote Location – Cocos (Keeling) Islands’.  Keen to continue her research in the sustainability of regional and remote locations through the implementation of tourism strategies, Kim was accepted through the Curtin Sustainable Tourism Centre at Curtin University in 2011 for research in a Doctor of Philosophy (PhD).  Her current research focuses on the economic diversification of regional mining communities, and is titled, ‘The Development of Sustainable Tourism as an Economic Alternative to Supplement Mining Based Regional Economies – Kalgoorlie, Western Australia’.

Since commencing Economic Transitions in 2011, Kim has focused on the development of sustainable tourism as an alternative for economic growth in regional Australia.

Presentation Title: Development of a Strategy for Sustainable Tourism – Shire of Leonora, North Eastern Goldfields of Western Australia

Overview: Mining in the Goldfields of Western Australia has experienced unprecedented growth over the past few decades. Many shires and towns have survived on a mono-economy which ultimately matures in parallel with the mining lifecycle. However, the mining lifecycle is dependent on a number of variables which makes the market both volatile and capricious. The Shire of Leonora (Shire), a remote outback town in the North Eastern Goldfields of Western Australia, is one such town. Recognising that its longer term sustainability required economic diversification, the Shire undertook the development of a tourism strategy which would have the potential to provide commercial multiplicity and social value.

This paper aims to provide economic and tourism developers in regional centres an outline of the process undertaken in developing a working tourism strategy with the Shire of Leonora, and to illustrate the importance of stakeholder engagement and community participation in developing a working strategy.

The contents of the paper will include the geographical, economic and social overview of the Shire of Leonora; identify the outcomes required by the Shire; apply models and tools in developing the strategy to ensure practicable outcomes; identify the carrying capacity of the Shire for the tourism sector; consider the processes established to ensure community participation in recognising current and potential tourist attractions in the Shire; identify future tourism potential through project development categorised into short, medium and long term projects; and the importance of risk analysis in project development.

The conclusions of the paper will assess the completion of the tourism strategy, post submission endorsement by Council, project commencement and funding, and where are they now.

About the Conference
The Australian Regional Development Conference is an initiative of the Association for Sustainability in Business Inc., a non-Government ‘not-for-profit’ organisation. The 2015 theme is “Redefining the Future of Regional Australia”, it will explore the issues and opportunities facing Regional Australia today and into the future.

Concurrent streams will focus on the following topics:

  • Sustainability / Renewables
  • Population Movements
  • Community Development
  • Government Policy
  • Innovation
  • Infrastructure
  • Cultural Tourism / Regional Tourism Development
  • Free Trade Agreements
  • Transport and Logistics
  • NBN / Broadband Communication
  • Banking / Finance

To view and/or download the Conference program, please click here.  For information on registration or to book your delegate pass, visit the website here.

Greg Lawrence of Riverina Regional Tourism presenting at the Australian Regional Development Conference

Greg Lawrence, Director and Chair of Riverina Regional Tourism to present at the Australian Regional Development Conference being held at the Commercial Club Albury on the 26– 27 August 2015.

Greg Lawrence

Greg Lawrence

Speaker Introduction: Greg has over 40 years experience in the tourism industry, working in the Cruise industry with companies like P&O, Cunard & Sitmar, as well as the Golf, wine. Greg and his wife Fiona also owned a country pub in North-east Victoria and Greg has now joined local government in the tourism & economic development. Greg also believes in giving back and has been a Board member of destination Albury Wodonga as deputy chair, president of Australian Institute of Travel & Tourism, was treasurer of the Deniliquin chamber of commerce and on the executive of the Griffith Business Chamber. Greg is passionate about tourism, customer service and development.

Presentation Title: The Riverina – More than just Food and Wine

Overview: The Riverina region of NSW is a largely untapped tourism destination. Covering a huge area of approximately 60,000 km2, the region’s main industry is agriculture. Tourism is not high on the political agenda, and funding from government and industry for tourism promotion is limited.

About the Conference:  The Australian Regional Development Conference is an initiative of the Association for Sustainability in Business Inc., a non-Government ‘not-for-profit’ organisation.

Themed Redefining the Future of Regional Australia, the Conference will explore the issues and opportunities facing Regional Australia today and into the future. 

Concurrent session topics:

  • Sustainability / Renewables
  • Population Movements
  • Community Development
  • Government Policy
  • Innovation
  • Infrastructure
  • Cultural Tourism / Regional Tourism Development
  • Free Trade Agreements
  • Transport and Logistics
  • NBN / Broadband Communication
  • Banking / Finance

For more information and/or to register for the Conference, please visit the website here.

Regional Australia Institute predicts $10 billion boom for Toowoomba and Surat Basin

The Darling Downs’ economy is predicted to grow by about $10 billion by 2030. (Brisbane Times)

There’s far more to a predicted $10 billion boom in Toowoomba and the Surat Basin than mining, says the head of the independent think tank working with leaders to unlock its potential.

Resources have dominated much of the discussion about the Darling Downs’ economy recently, especially with the world’s first export of controversial coal seam gas coming from the Surat Basin in December.

Regional Australia Institute deputy chief executive officer Jack Archer has been speaking to mayors, business leaders and other stakeholders in the region this week about how they can capitalise on that and other opportunities in the region.

He said it was important not to overstate the role of resources in the region’s development.

“It’s about growing the things that sit on top of that mining base,” he said.

Transport … is connected into that, but agriculture and manufacturing and the city itself are also really important for the economy, so mining and mining investment is really only one part of the picture.”

The $10 billion figure comes from an RAI project to model economic growth for all regions around the country from 2011 to 2030.

It represents the upper range of the prediction, but even the most pessimistic outlook would see the economy grow by about $8.3 billion – more than double what it is now.

With a general idea of the region’s potential in mind, representatives from Toowoomba and Surat Basin Enterprise approached the RAI to help ensure the region didn’t squander its opportunities.

“We know there’s opportunity that comes with brand new world class infrastructure but we haven’t as a region sat back and said what are we going to be able to take advantage of now that we have that infrastructure?” CEO Shane Charles said.

“We probably just needed the assistance of someone to coordinate the regions and we needed someone with the expertise to be able to crunch the data and tell us objectively what our weaknesses are and what our strengths are.”

Mr Archer said Toowoomba and the Maranoa and Western Downs regions, which made up much of the Surat Basin, were in unique positions nationally, with opportunities in not just mining but also agriculture, manufacturing, education, finance, health and logistics…

Read more by Jorge Branco, Brisbane Times 21 January 2015


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Investing In What Works for America’s Communities

Investing In What Works for America’s Communities » Community Development in Rural America: Collaborative, Regional, and Comprehensive.

This is an excellent article and could have been written with many Australian Rural areas in mind… I hope conference delegates find it thought provoking…. Peter Sugg

Growth and liveability in the Australian regional towns: A Case Study of Mackay, Queensland

Growth and liveability in the Australian regional towns: MackayThe main driver behind the growth of Australian regional towns, especially of those in Queensland and Western Australia, is the continuous development of resources such as coal industry boom.  This study undertook three growth indicators such as population trend, labour force movement and gross state products to characterise the growth of a regional city in Queensland, Mackay, which has been affected by coal mining boom in the central Queensland region since 2000.  Then the study undertook a large scale survey to understand the regional liveability, including the liveability of Mackay. The study found that the liveability of Mackay did not match with the level of growth in and around the city, and the condition of economic and environmental capitals is better than that of human and social capitals.  Therefore, the priority areas to increase the liveability within this city are to increase the human development services such as education, training and health facilities and to improve social cohesion and community empowerment.

The findings from this study are replicable to other similar regional towns in Australia or internationally where the city has a mix of mining services, agricultural trading and tourism activities.

The main driver behind the growth of Australian regional towns, especially of those in Queensland and Western Australia, is the continuous development of resources such as coal industry boom. The characterisation of these regional towns is important for planning and development of respective region. Mackay is one of the regional towns in Queensland, which has been affected by the resource booms in the northern Bowen Basin region . The purpose of this paper is to present a growth scenario of Mackay and relate this scenario with the regional liveability.

The paper “Growth and liveability in the Australian regional towns” has been peer reviewed and was published in the Book of Proceedings.  It was authored by Delwar Akbar, Lindsay Greer and John Rolfe from the Centre for Environmental Management, CQ University.

You can download the full paper here: Growth and liveability in the Australian regional towns