Let’s get the supply chain right says Michael Kilgariff, Australian Logistics Council

Michael Kilgariff - photo

Mr Michael Kilgariff, Managing Director, Australian Logistics Council

The Australian Logistics Council (ALC) is the peak industry body for Australia’s freight and logistics industry, and the leader in the national debate on the steps needed to boost supply chain efficiency and safety. ALC Managing Director Michael Kilgariff as a Keynote Speaker at the 3rd Australian Regional Development Conference will be speaking on; Getting the Supply Chain Right’.

The ALC represents the major and national companies participating in the Australian freight logistics supply chain industry.

National Freight Task

Mr Kilgariff will discuss the development of a National Freight and Supply Chain Strategy, which is needed to underpin future actions and reforms across the logistics industry.  Another priority area is the roll-out of the Inland Rail Project. Connecting Brisbane and Melbourne, critical to many regional areas throughout Victoria, New South Wales and Queensland, Michael will discuss how investments in key ‘last mile’ road projects, particularly  in regional Australia, are critical to boosting economic growth and employment across our regions.

Michael is a strong advocate for more productive supply chains which he argues are critical to meeting a national freight task which is expected to increase significantly over the coming decades. He holds a degree in Economics from the Australian National University, and is a Graduate of the Australian Institute of Company Directors’ diploma and advanced diploma courses.

The 3rd Australian Regional Development Conference; Participation and Progress will be held in Canberra on 5 – 6 September 2016 to register for the conference CLICK HERE.

Early bird closes on 25th July so be quick to receive a discounted rate.

The conference explores opportunities for innovation in regional Australia. With its rich resources, diversity, and value, regional Australia is the catalyst for the future.

Addressing issues such as sustainable development, environmental sustainability, land use, community development, investment, agribusiness and innovation it is an opportunity not to be missed.

Simon McArthur discusses the Sustainable Tourism Model

Simon McArthur - photo

Associate Professor Simon McArthur, Deputy Chair, Australian Regional Tourism Network

Discussing the Sustainable Tourism Model will be Associate Professor Simon McArthur, Deputy Chair, Australian Regional Tourism Network as a Keynote Speaker at the 3rd Australian Regional Development Conference Participation and Progress to be held in Canberra on 5 – 6 September 2016.

Simon will be speaking on ‘Out with the Plan, in with the Model’.

Many standard tourism plans have tried to introduce actions to move tourism towards a more sustainable approach. But plans are like a visitor’s photo – almost as soon as the shot is taken, the people and place changes. Enter a new approach – the Sustainable Tourism Model (or STM).

The Sustainable Tourism Model

The STM is like a living, breathing plan, but it only triggers action when reliable feedback says it is critical, and even them it has an armament of sliding scale responses to choose from. Now we monitor, learn and respond when needed, and when it’s fixed, we back off and return to monitoring.

The STM addresses three questions:

  1. Where do we want to be (the conventional desired future stuff of a tourism plan)
  2. How do we know how close we are (clever monitoring linked to maximum and minimum realistic standards)
  3. What do we do if the standards aren’t being met (multiple choice options to respond, known as adaptive management)

Case Studies Presented

This presentation will profile a collection of STM’s and derive some key lessons for those contemplating them. Case studies will include: South Australia’s Kangaroo Island (the longest running STM); Sydney’s former Quarantine Station (where the STM is managed by a tourism operator to look after their cultural tourism site, and avoid expensive regulation, and the Bahamas (covering a marine environment and multiple local communities) and Cyprus (featuring the latest in information technology for any user to grasp).

Simon has 25 years’ experience in tourism planning, development and operations. He has extensive qualifications that include a Masters in Business Administration, PhD in Tourism Management, Associate Professorship in Hotel Management and Bachelor of Applied Science in Natural Resource Management. He is Deputy Chairperson of the Australian Regional Tourism Network and has been a Board Member for several years.

The 3rd Australian Regional Development Conference; Participation and Progress will be held in Canberra on 5 – 6 September 2016 to register for the conference CLICK HERE.

Early bird closes on 25th July so be quick to receive a discounted rate. To view the Conference Program CLICK HERE. With over 60 speakers and 7 keynote speakers, an Awards Dinner for the ‘Regional Innovation Awards’ (now open) it is a Conference opportunity not to be missed.

The conference explores opportunities for innovation in regional Australia. With its rich resources, diversity, and value, regional Australia is the catalyst for the future and the Conference addresses issues such as sustainable development, environmental sustainability, land use, community development, investment, agribusiness and innovation.

Regional Development Conference: Last Chance for Early Bird!

sundrop farm1The 3rd Australian Regional Development Conference; Participation and Progress will be held in Canberra on 5 – 6 September 2016.

Regional Australia – Planning, Participation and Progress will explore opportunities for innovation in regional Australia. With its rich resources, diversity, and value, regional Australia is the catalyst for the future.

The Conference Program is now available. CLICK HERE to view the Program.

To register your attendance at the conference CLICK HERE. Early bird closes on 25th July so be quick to receive a discounted rate.

The Conference addresses issues such as sustainable development, environmental sustainability, land use, community development, investment, agribusiness and innovation.

With program content including an extensive range of topics from Keynote Presenters, Concurrent Sessions, Case Studies and Poster Presentations, this is a Conference for planners, local Councils, Government, business, NGO, community organisations, academics and professionals with an interest in regional sustainability.

With over 60 speakers and 7 keynote speakers, it is a Conference opportunity not to be missed.

Confirmed Keynote Speakers include; Michael Kilgariff, Managing Director, Australian Logistics Council (ALC) – which represents the major and national companies participating in the Australian freight logistics supply chain industry and Warwick Powell, founder and Chairman of Sister City Partners Ltd, a regional not-for-profit investment banking enterprise. He is also a Director of a number of companies in Australia and Hong Kong involved in investment banking, big data analytics, renewable energy and agribusiness services.

Keynote Speakers Nicky Ison, Senior Research Consultant at the Institute for Sustainable Futures (ISF) at the University of Technology, Sydney and Jarra Hicks, PhD Candidate at the University of New South Wales are co-founders of Community Power Agency which helps to grow a vibrant community energy sector in Australia and they also helped to found the Coalition for Community Energy, working to address the barriers to the development of a wider Australian community energy sector.  Together they have been instrumental in the development of community energy policy in NSW, Victoria and federally.

Dr David Fleming, President of the AARES ACT Branch and associate Editor in the journal Resources Policy is also a confirmed Keynote Speaker.

Dr. Fleming’s research analyses different issues linked to economic growth and regional development, employing mainly econometric models and spatial analysis. He also specialises in impact evaluation.

Other confirmed Keynote Speakers will be announced shortly.

The conference is an initiative of the Association for Sustainability in Business Inc., a non-Government not-for-profit organisation.

CLICK HERE to register your attendance at the 2016 conference. Be quick to book as early bird closes 25th July 2016.

Fast-track solution to put Iron Triangle back on the rails

adelaide railAfter proposing a fast passenger rail linking Adelaide with Victor Harbor,  say there is also a strong case for a service linking the state’s capital with the struggling Iron Triangle towns of Whyalla, Port Augusta and Port Pirie as discussed by Richard Blandy and Edwin Michell.

The main attraction of fast rail is not inter-city travel between megacities, but for regional and commuter travel between country towns and city CBDs. These are the rail lines where value is generated (and can be captured) to finance the rail projects.

Additionally, they would reduce pressure on the South Australian Government to expand Adelaide’s urban boundary by redistributing a portion of the state’s population to the regions. This would also reduce the capital’s imposing dominance over the rest of the state.

A fast railway to the Iron Triangle towns of South Australia’s Gulf regions, with stops at Salisbury, Port Pirie and Port Augusta, would service a combined regional population in excess of 60,000. It could also be accessed by more than 80,000 people in the northern suburbs of Adelaide near Salisbury, together with substantial mining, tourism and agricultural interests in nearby regions.

Whyalla, Port Augusta and Port Pirie are all struggling economically for a variety of reasons.

The region’s fortunes can be revived by removing non-essential business regulations and providing substantial regional tax breaks for companies and individuals. This would encourage entrepreneurs, innovators, and small – and possibly large – businesses to relocate there.

An Adelaide-Whyalla railway could be highly profitable in the short term, particularly with the co-operation of the South Australian Government to make suitable development sites available and leasing parts of the railway to expand metropolitan services. To read more click here.

The 3rd Australian Regional Development Conference; Participation and Progress will be held in Canberra on 5 – 6 September 2016 to register for the conference CLICK HERE.

The conference explores opportunities for innovation in regional Australia. With its rich resources, diversity, and value, regional Australia is the catalyst for the future.

Addressing issues such as sustainable development, environmental sustainability, land use, community development, investment, agribusiness and innovation it is an opportunity not to be missed.

NT to receive better deal from Building Better Regions Fund

fiona nash 2A Federal fund for regions that pumped millions into capital cities will now be restructured to ensure the money comes to the Territory and other regional areas.

Before the start of the election campaign, the NT News revealed nearly $50 million from the National Stronger Regions Fund (NSRF), touted as a victory for regional Australia, was going towards suburbs in major capital cities.

Projects within 3km of the CBD in Brisbane were funded by the first two rounds of the program, while $33 million was spent on Melbourne proposals, including a water park.

But Minister for Regional Development Fiona Nash will today pledge to improve the scheme she inherited, transforming it into the Building Better Regions Fund (BBRF).

“As Regional Development Minister, my vision is to help build the regional communities our children and grandchildren either want to stay in or come back to,” Ms Nash said.

“We don’t want to lose the talents of our young people to the cities, and creating regional, rural and remote communities they’d love to live in is one way to make sure that doesn’t happen.”

The new scheme will now only go towards projects outside capital cities and will target two streams, infrastructure projects and community investments.About $505 million was spent on the first two rounds of the NSRF, with the remaining cash from the $1 billion scheme to run through the rounds of the BBRF.

The program is expected to run until 2020, with the potential to be extended after that.

Proposals in regional capitals like Darwin and Hobart will still be eligible for funding, while those in major metropolitan areas such as Sydney or Melbourne will not.

Ms Nash said the new scheme would have a fairer assessment process, sorting proposals into categories based on size.

“It’s very hard for smaller and more remote community and volunteer groups or small councils to compete for funding against big capital city councils who have the ability to employ consultants to write grant applications,” she said.

“It also makes sense to assess small projects against small projects, medium-sized projects against medium-sized, and major projects against major projects. A $500,000 project should not be competing with a $20 million project for funding.” To read more click here.

The 3rd Australian Regional Development Conference; Participation and Progress will be held in Canberra on 5 – 6 September 2016 to register for the conference CLICK HERE.

The conference explores opportunities for innovation in regional Australia. With its rich resources, diversity, and value, regional Australia is the catalyst for the future.

Addressing issues such as sustainable development, environmental sustainability, land use, community development, investment, agribusiness and innovation it is an opportunity not to be missed.